Go Fish: Where to Go Fishing with Kids




Fishing is a classic summertime activity. It's relaxing, it's a great way to bond, plus it teaches patience. The GTA offers different kinds of fishing experiences and there are even organisations that supply the rod, reel, tackle and bait so all you need to bring is a good attitude. Kids don't require a license to fish but all Canadians between the ages of 18 and 64 years must purchase a valid fishing license to legally fish in Ontario, so make sure you get one if you're looking to drop a line. Our rivers, lakes, and ponds are well supplied with fish, and we've got the scoop on where you and your kids can catch them.

Where to Go Fishing with Kids...

You can fish at most of Ontario’s major urban centres by sitting along lakes and rivers with great fishing, like:

Toronto
• Lake Ontario waterfront
• Toronto Islands, a ferry ride from downtown Toronto

Halton Region
• Burns Conservation Area: Twiss Rd. and #10 Sideroad
• Bronte Harbour Park: Lakeshore Rd. W. at Bronte Rd.
• Tannery Park: Chisholm St., south of Lakeshore Rd. E.

York Region
• Musselman’s Lake: Hwy. 48 and Aurora Rd.

Durham Region
• Wilmot Creek: creek crossing at Hwy. 2
• Wilmot Creek: downstream of Hwy. 401 railway crossing
• Kendal Crown Property: Regional Road 9, east of Hwy. 35/115
• Joe Fowler Memorial Park: Port Perry off Water St.
• Trent Canal: Gambridge Lock 41 under Hwy. 12 bridge
• Nonquon River: between 8th and 12th Concession
• Bowmanville Harbour Conservation Area: Liberty St., south of Hwy. 401
• Bowmanville Valley Conservation Area: Roenick St., south of Hwy. 2
• Heber Down Conservation Area: Regional Rd. 23 and Hwy. 12 N. of Taunton Rd.
• Lynde Shores Conservation Area: Brock St. south of Hwy. 401
• Oshawa Valleylands Conservation Area: Simcoe St., south of Hwy 401, west to Whiting Ave.

ONTARIO FAMILY FISHING EVENTS

The Ontario Family Fishing Event is a province-wide opportunity for Canadian residents to fish Ontario waters without the otherwise mandatory fishing version outdoors card. July 4-12, 2015 (12:01 a.m. Saturday to 11:59 p.m. Sunday) are the Ontario Government designated license-free days. During all other time periods, Canadian residents between the ages of 18 and 64 years must purchase a valid fishing license to legally fish in Ontario. It's the perfect opportunity introduce kids to fishing! CLICK HERE to get a list of Fishing Events coming this July.

NO GEAR? NO PROBLEM!

If you don't have any fishing gear and you want to make sure the kids enjoy the sport before investing in any equipment, look into the TackleShare program. It lends basic fishing gear to children or novice anglers who don’t have their own equipment. And it’s free! You can pick up gear at locations in many urban fishing centres, including: libraries, Big Brothers and Sisters, Conservation Authorities and Ontario provincial parks. CLICK HERE for more info on the TackleShare program.

City Fishing Fundamentals

Here are some basic fishing fundamentals published by the province of Ontario when it comes to city fishing:

1. Get a License: if you’re between the ages of 18 and 64, you’ll need a licence to fish other than at Ontario Family Fishing Events where one is not required.
2. Get to know the Rules and Regulations. Many fish have open and closed seasons and limits on the size and number of fish you can keep.
3. No trespassing. City fishing sites often border private property (boundaries are not always marked.)
4. Catch and Release. Observe the practise of keeping a few fish and releasing the rest to help ensure a good fishery for future generations.
5. Respect other fishers. Be courteous and do not crowd them.
6. Stay safe: always exercise caution when fishing near flowing water, wear life jackets, and know which fish you can eat and which you can’t.

Source: www.ontario.ca/travel-and-recreation/city-fishing.

What places have you taken the kids to go fishing? Share below!

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